PUSSY POSSE BEANIE

PUSSY POSSE BEANIE

The Women’s March in Washington D.C. on January 21st, 2017 was one of the best days of my life. For me personally, it was so powerful to see millions of women (and men) across the world, marching with one unified voice and agenda: to influence the equality of women’s rights globally.

The marches were so emotional in both coming-together and pure sentiment, that it inspired me to derive a spin on the famous pink Pussy Hat – a way for us to remind ourselves of the torch that we need to continue to carry forward.

Our practical and black Merino Wool hat called the Pussy Posse Beanie is a symbol of both equal rights as well as our commitment to women supporting women. Being hand knit in Seattle by the same woman who made my personal pink Pussy Hat for the march in Washington D.C. on January 21st, 2017, adds an extra dose of love to this small and limited collection. Each Beanie also includes a black safety pin at the back of the hat – a symbol of solidarity.

I’ve always been a big believer in clothes having the ability to communicate powerful messages. Our Pussy Posse Beanie is a strong statement to the world: one where we say that WE stand for love, diversity, and equality.

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HAPPY 3rd BIRTHDAY dE ROSAIRO

HAPPY 3rd BIRTHDAY dE ROSAIRO

1,095 days later and we’re still celebrating and empowering women of all walks and from all around the world.

To celebrate our 3rd birthday, nothing makes us happier than to gift $6,000 worth of dE ROSAIRO designs to the beautiful and strong women survivors of human trafficking through Not For Sale – a non profit organization that we continue to partner with because they spend every waking minute making a substantial difference to the lives of women survivors from The Netherlands to Peru to San Francisco to Myanmar.

By gifting our designs to these women, we want them to feel as good as you feel. We want them to know that they deserve a second chance at life. And we also want them to believe that we actively support their dreams.
The world is truly a magical place when we stand together, rise together, and imagine together.

Happy 3rd birthday to us!

HAPPY 2017 – LET'S CREATE MAGIC

HAPPY 2017 – LET'S CREATE MAGIC

Exactly one year ago I remember so vividly reflecting on the year and writing my last blog of 2015 from a beach club in Rio de Janeiro. How time flies. I can still inhale the enigmatic scent of beach salt, caipirinha’s and Brazilian bikini’s.

This time 13,674 miles in the other direction of the world, I’m at Cloud Red, a rooftop terrace in Colombo reflecting on 2016. Sri Lanka is an island that has morphed into a tropical destination of high-end cafes, beach resorts, and stylish men and women flocking to the latest this and that.

One of my favorite experiences while I travel is to observe how men and women interact with the clothes they wear as a form of culture and lifestyle. To some, clothing is a pure function of addressing a basic need. And to the more interesting others, their clothing acts as a voice, playing an important role in elevating levels of confidence and poise.

2016 was all about elevating the 'Look Feel Lead' game of women around the world. We dressed women from Melbourne to Switzerland to Prague to Hong Kong to New York to San Francisco; women who have raved about how our designs make them feel luxurious and fabulous!

In 2017, my goal is to equip even more women around the world with the armor they need to up-level their narrative and curate their lives. All while doing good business, of course.

As the New Year dawns, I wish you a remarkable year of life and experiences. This is the year to love more, to live with conviction, and to create magic.

Happy 2017… our best year yet!

XO
Nishika de Rosairo​

dE ROSAIRO Woman: A Man's Perspective

dE ROSAIRO Woman: A Man's Perspective

Full Name: Egon Barbosa
City and Country: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Title: Emerging Businesses Director
Company: The Coca-Cola Company

What about your career makes you feel proud?
I’ve built my career based on curiosity. My way of thinking is totally random and I have always felt that I have had a different profile compared to the expected executive profile. Having shaped my own way, based on sailing the environment, exploring different possibilities, and fighting against patterns, I can now see a connection in myself from the past to the same mental model of the millenial’s who are changing the world. So this makes me proud. It makes me proud because of the way I chose to cross over to my career destination, and because of the opportunity to reshape the future, which is the reason why I still wake up every morning proudly dreaming.

What inspired you to be doing what you are in your career?
My career was itself “the diversity”. I studied electrical engineer, then advertising and social communications. I’ve been a musician, actor, tv show presenter, and journalist before I fell in love with marketing & innovation. I’ve even founded my own marketing strategy consulting firm and interacted with lots of different customer profiles. So I’ve learned a lot on how diversity always builds better results (and sometimes even when you disagree with the final solution!). This wisdom on diversity is something that everyone should take with them throughout their life. For me, what I experienced in my life was no different in my career. So I used that experience to build winning teams and stronger networks.

As a male, what are some of the challenges you face in the workforce?
The main challenge for me is how to provide attention to detail, as it matters, how to view things from a different perspective, and how to use my male energy to be soft when it is needed.

How important is it to you that we recognize and grow women leaders as a society, and why?
This is a subject that I used to say was an old fashioned matter (or that it should already be). Maybe this is only in my positive mind, because companies and societies are still working on this issue. For me personally, I would like to see us evolve past celebrating “woman’s day” or sharing quotes on women in leadership positions; we should evolve past this if the only reason we are celebrating such days and sharing these quotes is simply because women are not recognized enough. Women should exist, as men exist, and they should have equal opportunities and rights, just as men do. And as such we should be celebrating “leadership day” for both men and women. The fact that this discussion still persists makes me sad about humanity, because I do not think that gender should ever define someone’s capacity. What should define someone’s capacity is education and personal development. I believe we need to leverage the intelligence that exists in women. Also just as importantly, and to my discontent, we need to continue to educate the world to be better prepared to leverage the best potential everyone has, no matter what gender they may be.

What advice do you have for leaders on the topic of diversity, both men and women alike?
It’s not advice, it is a warning! Open your eyes to diversity. The best ideas are the collective ones. The best innovation is not a brilliant idea that a lonely genius has. If not by beliefs or by personal values, the understanding of the market dynamics should be enough to imagine diversity balancing the leadership in the world. The market is diverse. The consumer is becoming more specific with time, and similarly the stimuli the consumer receives that reshapes demand is even more diverse every day. Everyone should learn to bring ideas to life and to lead with diversity.

Favorite quote and by whom?
“Whatever you think, think the opposite” | Paul Arden

How does what you wear make you feel?
I like to wear what makes me feel comfortable and special at the same time. Confidence is translated on to one’s self image. So, what brings me indulgence beyond food and drinks, I love!

What everyday luxuries do you enjoy?
Gourmet food at fine restaurants and time to be with family and friends (the latter of which is rare nowadays and it’s a luxury, definitely).

What is your favorite dE ROSAIRO design?
Selene tee: because it is chic and basic at the same time. I love the sophistication by simplicity. I love black.

What social media links can we find you on?
LinkedIn

MESMERIZED IN A VORTEX OF PARISIAN CHIC

MESMERIZED IN A VORTEX OF PARISIAN CHIC

I just returned back to San Francisco after enveloping myself for a month in Paris and a few other European cities that immediately stole my heart.  Paris is no stranger to me, and every time I’m there, my mind and creativity elevates to new capsules of chic magnitude.  The majestic mental transitions that occur simply by observing architectural masterpieces, the elegant way of life, and of course Parisian street fashion, can only serve as a vortex through which to lose yourself in the vast beauty of this historically glamorous city.

The beginning of my summer in Europe served as an opportune time to break away, expand my mind, and design my next pieces.  I spent my first week in Paris paying attention to layers of street interactions involving fabrics, silhouettes, and designer brands – the psychological depth behind the clothes we wear.  My consumption was confronted by a sea of emotions that spelt out the word ‘CHIC’ in big bold letters, no matter which way I looked.  It was marvelous, sexy, and addictive.

I spent many intimate evenings with my Parisian friends at dinners, dancing, and just enjoying a glass or two of wine outside.  If you’ve spent time in Paris, you already know that when you sit outside, you typically sit next to each other and face the street, so you can watch the live show of art, fashion, and life… dreamingly wandering right past you.  Through these ‘shows’ and my interactions I became more in tune to how Parisians ‘Look Feel Lead’ their lives with so much sexual confidence and elegance.  It was beautiful.  And of course the minimalist form of living exuded ‘Less Is More’ from every angle - an art of living that I believe produces happiness and purpose.

My senses were constantly heightened, and I was enjoying every instance of it.  In the afternoons, I would find myself with a sketchbook alongside the Seine in a café, or sitting somewhere on a city bench, passed by endless pedestrians.  The effortless looks on the streets continued to inspire me in how they transpired into function, beauty, and form.  And then it dawned on me that my dE ROSAIRO woman needed two more essentials in her wardrobe – a pair of slick black pants and the perfect pencil – marking the continuation of our ‘Look Feel Lead’ chapter by way of Parisian chic.  Back in the studio, the search has begun for luxe soft hand fabrications that encapsulate the perfect silhouette of sexy, salty, and serious.  I’m excited for what I have in store for you.  Are you?

dE ROSAIRO Woman: A Man's Perspective

dE ROSAIRO Woman: A Man's Perspective

Full Name: David Batstone
City and Country: San Francisco, USA
Title: Founder & President
Company: Not For Sale

What about your career makes you feel proud?
I am constantly inventing. I believe that the status quo needs to be changed, such that the same old methods will not ‘be’ the change. I have dedicated myself to reinventing business models and the ways we practice charity. I have dedicated myself to sustainability where I get to create a world in which my children’s children can thrive.

What inspired you to be doing what you are in your career?
I was open to what the world brought me. My favorite restaurant in the San Francisco Bay Area turned out to be the center of a human trafficking ring that delivered hundreds of teenagers from the region of Bangalore, India into California for the purpose of forced labor, in other words, modern slavery. I was deeply saddened by this discovery, and so I began investigating where else this might be happening in the world. I discovered that it was an international problem that stretched all the way into my own backyard. I could not stand by and do nothing. This is how Not For Sale was born.

Why does being involved in human trafficking matter?
Human trafficking is the extreme action of taking away an individual’s dignity. To steal someone’s destiny, to take away their freedom, is the ultimate exploitation. That is not the world I want to live in. Being an American, and being from a family legacy of people in Europe who fled religious and political persecution, I survived because someone stood up for me. The burden of history, for the future, rests with me, and those of us alive in this generation. Not For Sale is my way of standing up for those exploited through the unspeakable act of human trafficking.

On your journey to success what role has diversity played in your career and in your life?
Diversity is beautiful; it completes us in those ways where we feel partial. I have certain strengths, and definite weaknesses. So in whatever role I take on I search for those who can enhance my mission, complete my task, extend my reach. Intolerance for diversity typically is borne out of fear, and out of insecurity. But to free yourself up to the world, and to see the richness of diverse people, cultures, and lifestyles, generates opportunity and creativity.

As a male, what are some of the challenges you face in the workforce?
For anyone, male or female, the work place is a competitive playing field. It takes a tremendous amount of self-confidence to overcome temporary setbacks or the feedback loop that suggests you are not talented enough to carry out your aspirations. All the same, as a white male many of the challenges I face are those I create for myself; a lack of belief or execution on resources. Most women or people of color face challenges that are externally created. In other words, they face hurdles and dead ends that are generated by others. We’re talking self-created versus environmentally created challenges, and that’s a huge difference.

How important is it to you that we recognize and grow women leaders as a society, and why?
Women so often provide a perspective and a strategy for solving problems that are unique in comparison to what a male might provide. When we have only males around the table - which happens all too often in the world of business and politics - we are missing out on alternative solutions. In my experience, women tend to be much more pragmatic and persistent than my male colleagues, because they are used to multi-tasking as a working professional, a homemaker, a mother, among other things. All of these roles carry heavy responsibility, and women for the last couple of decades have been carrying these different roles out heroically.

What advice do you have for leaders on the topic of diversity, both men and women alike?
Embrace the other. Listen twice and speak once. Ask yourself each week if you feel smarter than the week before. If you can honestly say that you do not feel smarter than the week before, then you probably are living in stagnation. Diversity breeds learning and creative living, and for this reason and more we need both men and women at the table.

Favorite quote and by whom?
“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.

“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.” | Lord of the Rings

How does what you wear make you feel?
The clothes I wear make me feel confident and self-assured. It creates a mood - a form of wearapy. So dress like you mean it. Put your best shoe design forward at all times.

What everyday luxuries do you enjoy?
I like a Montecristo cigar along with a glass of 30 year-old Balvaine Scotch and a bubble bath.

What is your favorite dE ROSAIRO design?
My favorite design is the woman’s Smoking Jacket. It is elegant and sophisticated. If I met a woman at a cocktail party sporting this jacket I would think she is inspired and confident of her own talents.

What social media links can we find you on?
Twitter | Instagram | Facebook

dE ROSAIRO Woman: Commissioner on the Status of Women

dE ROSAIRO Woman: Commissioner on the Status of Women

Full Name: Breanna Zwart
City and Country: San Francisco, USA
Primary Title and Company: Associate at Google Access, Market and Public Sector Impact
Secondary Title and Company: Commissioner, San Francisco’s Commission on the Status of Women

What about your career makes you feel proud?
I feel extremely privileged to be able to continue working on projects, which have visible impact to the communities around us. Straight out of college, as a Policy Advisor in San Diego, I had the opportunity to work with constituents, city departments, and other government agencies to secure funding for the construction of the first community library in Skyline in 25 years. After which, while at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, I developed recommendations and guidelines in the measurement and tracking of outcomes in financial access programs across international institutions, such as the World Bank, to account for gender-based impacts.
Now with Google, I’ve been able to continue working with the World Bank to advance best practices of Internet infrastructure. My day-to-day role involves working at both the global and local level, expanding Internet access for people around the world, and impacting men and women in their communities.

What inspired you to be doing what you are in your career?
My family has, and continues, to inspire me. My grandparents grew up in the rural Jim Crow south, but went on to get their college degrees, and advanced degrees. My grandmother’s civic leadership and ability to care for others has always served as a model to which I aspire. She’s not ashamed to take the lead and take credit. My father’s entrepreneurship showed me what it meant to bust your chops for your own ideas. My mother’s ability to rise above a difficult upbringing has shown me what perseverance is. I’ve tried to take the best from all of them and apply it to what I do every day.

What inspired you to serve on San Francisco’s Commission on the Status of Women?
In college, I was a co-director of Strong Women, Strong Girls, where I mentored 3rd through 5th graders in Pittsburgh elementary schools and community organizations. The curriculum used female role models to introduce girls to different careers, promote college, and to enable the girls to focus on skill building activities to increase their confidence. Tina was one of the many girls I worked with at the time, and she served as a role model to me in terms of how a little girl with the right support and opportunity can find her own wings to transform and fly. These individual encounters stuck with me.

I believe that women and girls should have equal opportunities to become individuals and unashamedly pursue their dreams. In order for this to happen, I believe systemic change is essential, and that’s why I serve on the commission. As a Commissioner, I work with my colleagues to advocate for women, and to ensure that women in San Francisco are not held back by systemic barriers. The Commission is dedicated to a broad range of issues affecting women and girls, including violence prevention, gender equality in the workplace, and equal representation on public decision-making bodies. As one of the strongest women's commissions in the country, we have led the way on innovative policies that reduce the incidence of violence against women in our neighborhoods, and enhance gender equality in local government and in local companies.

What are your top priorities as the Women’s Commissioner of San Francisco?
One of my top priorities for the City and County of San Francisco is to continue to be on the forefront of equality, as well as update our municipal ordinance, passed in 1998, that is based upon the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). The commission has a rich history and legacy as a leader, and we need to make sure that we remain on the forefront of gender equality.

My top priority is to make sure that San Francisco’s ordinance is not just window dressing and is operationalized by city and county leadership. This means creating Gender Action Plans for departments that are updated on a bi-annual basis. Further, I would like to see consistent reporting on how the city is performing in regards to workforce representation, retention, and pay equity. I believe, and the literature backs me up on this, that the ability of policymakers and City leadership to monitor and improve these measures will lead to better quality of city services.

On your journey to success what has been your greatest challenge?
My greatest professional challenge has been carving out a space at the table when decisions are being made, and also being able to effectively advocate for my positions in the workplace and in the boardroom. Being a strong advocate is about finding your voice and having a sense of who you are, which is itself a journey. Luckily, I had a strong sense of self at a young age. Yet even with that, having knowledge and confidence is often viewed askance when it’s held by someone who is female and of color. This dynamic is a continuing challenge that I think never really goes away. You have to be sharp and know how to present yourself and your ideas to appeal to your audience. You need to build relationships and trust with colleagues, partners, and leadership.

At the same time I do think we need to work towards a larger paradigm shift in the cultural norms of who is assumed and expected to be a leader within business, government, and philanthropic organizations. Traditionally, in the United States, the model of leadership was white and male. And so the problem to solve for is that leadership isn’t just white and male, leadership comes from all walks of life -- male and female, black, white, Latino, Asian, gay and straight. There are many officials and executives who understand this and who are working to incubate and affect a broader change in individual, cultural, and institutional attitudes along these lines. But at the end of the day, I cannot live my life worried about what other people think. In my perseverance to marry through with my own missions, I have realized it is a tightrope, reflected in the Serenity Prayer:

God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.

How important is it to you that we recognize and grow women leaders as a society, and why?
The fact that we still need to ask this question shows just how important it is. Women represent half the population, but we are not represented to that proportion in the leadership of the world’s major governments, corporations, or philanthropies. If you’re not at the table, then your interests are simply not going to be addressed. Women are disproportionately impacted by social problems, such as war, lack of infrastructure, or sub-par education.

Many leaders such as Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Sheryl Sandberg, or the columnist Nick Kristoff have written greatly about how investing in women provides disproportionate positive returns in terms of social and economic outcomes. I truly believe that if we had more women in the boardroom, in parliament, etc. the world would be a more just and prosperous place.

Leadership continues to be applauded for traits of transparency and vulnerability. How do you stay true to these traits in your day-to-day life and career?
I think we’re all human, we’re all fallible, we’re all imperfect, and because of that, being able to question yourself, share your personal life, and approach people collaboratively is what’s important. The ability to do those things lets people know you’re on their level, and if you’re good at what you do, that lends credibility.

A big part of effective leadership has to do with trust. I believe trust comes from letting people know where you stand and putting your cards on the table. In the past, trust as a leadership quality was not viewed as a “traditional” style of leadership, but we are starting to see it in the business literature -- that this style of leadership leads to better business outcomes. So, yes, I expect transparency and a level of vulnerability not only from my leadership, but I also try to model this behavior for myself in my own life.

What advice do you have for other women leaders?
Perseverance is key. No matter who you are, you’re going to face setbacks in life and in your career. You simply need to learn from them and become a stronger, smarter person. Women should embrace their emotional intelligence. It’s one of our strengths. And do not be afraid to ask for what you want.

Favorite quote and by whom?
“You are imperfect, you are wired for struggle, but you are worthy of love and belonging” – Brene Brown

How does what you wear make you feel?
It makes a huge difference. When I worked for the U.S. Treasury Department it was very formal and everyone wore suits everyday. While some people would think that’s stifling, I thought the opposite. It was fun to know exactly what the uniform was and to figure out how to stretch that framework, in other words, how could I make it reflect my personality and be unique in a sea of suits. In my current gig, there is no uniform at Google; tech companies tend to be very laid back. If you’re seen on campus wearing more traditional business attire, colleagues tend to think you came from a job interview, so naturally I choose to dress more informal at Google, but even still I pay attention to how what I wear makes me feel. I do think it is important to have special nights where you get to dress up and feel glamorous, and for me those nights involve going to events and shows on weeknights and weekends.

What everyday luxuries do you enjoy?
Fresh flowers, they always brighten up life and remind me of the beauty in the world.

What is your favorite dE ROSAIRO design?
There are so many beautiful pieces! I am coveting the Armed Dress, the Ruched Sleeve Jacket, the Cape Incision Jacket ... it is difficult to choose one!

What social media links can we find you on?
LinkedIn | Instagram

HAPPY 2ND BIRTHDAY dE ROSAIRO

HAPPY 2ND BIRTHDAY dE ROSAIRO

We’ve dressed so many women and achieved a lot in just two years.

Today we are a:

1. Design House (via the clothes we design for power women)

2. Leadership House (via our participation on advisory boards, speaking engagements, and 1:1 leadership coaching)

3. Non Profit House (via our engagement with women survivors of human trafficking)

To celebrate our birthday with the community, last week we donated $7000 worth of dE ROSAIRO clothing to survivors of human trafficking through our non-profit partner organization, Not For Sale.

To celebrate our birthday with YOU, we’re giving away up to $1000 worth of dE ROSAIRO designs to a lucky winner.

Click Here to Win and join our celebration of women empowerment, women employment, and doing ‘good business’ around the world.

With love,
Nishika de Rosairo